Discussion:
Direct cremations in Edinburgh
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Ian
2016-02-15 08:16:17 UTC
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Does anyone know of a company which will collect a body from the Royal Infirmary and take it to Mortonhall Crematorium for disposal? No service required, no coffin, no fuss.

Ian
Geoff Pearson
2016-02-15 12:42:26 UTC
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Post by Ian
Does anyone know of a company which will collect a body from the Royal
Infirmary and take it to Mortonhall >Crematorium for disposal? No service
required, no coffin, no fuss.
Ian
Ask the crematorium?
Ian
2016-02-17 01:18:36 UTC
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Post by Ian
Does anyone know of a company which will collect a body from the Royal Infirmary and take it to Mortonhall Crematorium for disposal? No service required, no coffin, no fuss.
Outcome: Scotmid attempted an extortionate charge but Purves were very much more amenable for less than half the cost. Very nice people to deal with as well, with a complete lack of unctuousness.
Sam Wilson
2016-02-17 10:47:19 UTC
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Post by Ian
Post by Ian
Does anyone know of a company which will collect a body from the Royal
Infirmary and take it to Mortonhall Crematorium for disposal? No service
required, no coffin, no fuss.
Outcome: Scotmid attempted an extortionate charge but Purves were very much
more amenable for less than half the cost. Very nice people to deal with as
well, with a complete lack of unctuousness.
I'm personal friends with a couple of people who work at Purves. Would
you mind if I pass that on?

Sam
--
The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
Scotland, with registration number SC005336.
Ian
2016-02-17 19:32:41 UTC
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Post by Sam Wilson
Post by Ian
Outcome: Scotmid attempted an extortionate charge but Purves were very much
more amenable for less than half the cost. Very nice people to deal with as
well, with a complete lack of unctuousness.
I'm personal friends with a couple of people who work at Purves. Would
you mind if I pass that on?
Please do.

Ian
DerekF
2016-03-06 06:33:11 UTC
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Post by Ian
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by Ian
Outcome: Scotmid attempted an extortionate charge but Purves were very much
more amenable for less than half the cost. Very nice people to deal with as
well, with a complete lack of unctuousness.
I'm personal friends with a couple of people who work at Purves. Would
you mind if I pass that on?
Please do.
Ian
I thought that all funerals required a coffin.
Derek
The Real Doctor
2016-03-14 11:23:20 UTC
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Post by DerekF
I thought that all funerals required a coffin
Nope. You can stick the dear departed in the ground in a duvet cover or
a couple of bin bags if you want. I think it's OK to bury them naked,
too. Crematoriums generally want a coffin for handling purposes, but
cardboard is fine, as is anything which meets the required dimensions
and doesn't leak bits out. If the body has already been dismantled,
perhaps for medical teaching, you can fit it in quite a small box.

Ian
Murff
2016-03-14 20:21:45 UTC
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Post by The Real Doctor
Post by DerekF
I thought that all funerals required a coffin
Nope. You can stick the dear departed in the ground in a duvet cover or
a couple of bin bags if you want. I think it's OK to bury them naked,
too. Crematoriums generally want a coffin for handling purposes, but
cardboard is fine, as is anything which meets the required dimensions
and doesn't leak bits out. If the body has already been dismantled,
perhaps for medical teaching, you can fit it in quite a small box.
Interesting timing. At the end of last week t'wife was discussing volume
with one of her maths classes... and included the question of "how many
students could you fit in this classroom".

The answer, obviously, depends on how they're processed first. And the
notion of mincing them was considered, in which case the answer came out
to be about 1000.
--
Murff...
bert
2016-03-15 08:39:14 UTC
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"how many students could you fit in this classroom".
The answer, obviously, depends on how they're processed first. And the
notion of mincing them was considered, in which case the answer came out
to be about 1000.
Why would mincing them make any significant difference? The
proportion of empty space in a large boxful of small spheres
is essentially independent of the actual size of the spheres.
--
Richard Tobin
2016-03-15 12:29:45 UTC
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Post by bert
"how many students could you fit in this classroom".
The answer, obviously, depends on how they're processed first. And the
notion of mincing them was considered, in which case the answer came out
to be about 1000.
Why would mincing them make any significant difference? The
proportion of empty space in a large boxful of small spheres
is essentially independent of the actual size of the spheres.
True if the spheres are all the same size. Mincing may produce
a less uniform range of sizes.

-- Richard
Sam Wilson
2016-03-15 15:31:34 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by bert
"how many students could you fit in this classroom".
The answer, obviously, depends on how they're processed first. And the
notion of mincing them was considered, in which case the answer came out
to be about 1000.
Why would mincing them make any significant difference? The
proportion of empty space in a large boxful of small spheres
is essentially independent of the actual size of the spheres.
True if the spheres are all the same size. Mincing may produce
a less uniform range of sizes.
Why assume spheres? Why infer rigidity?

Sam
--
The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
Scotland, with registration number SC005336.
Robert Inder (on Usenet)
2016-03-15 23:18:36 UTC
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Post by Sam Wilson
Why assume spheres? Why infer rigidity?
Which I mis-read as "why inter rigidity"...
DerekF
2016-03-19 23:29:36 UTC
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Post by The Real Doctor
Post by DerekF
I thought that all funerals required a coffin
Nope. You can stick the dear departed in the ground in a duvet cover or
a couple of bin bags if you want. I think it's OK to bury them naked,
too. Crematoriums generally want a coffin for handling purposes, but
cardboard is fine, as is anything which meets the required dimensions
and doesn't leak bits out. If the body has already been dismantled,
perhaps for medical teaching, you can fit it in quite a small box.
Ian
I read that cardboard is now being banned in some areas as the smoke
from them is not environmentally friendly.
I asked about one for my mothers funeral and the undertaker said that he
did not keep them in stock and would not have time to get one.
Derek
Sam Wilson
2016-03-21 10:20:58 UTC
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Post by DerekF
Post by The Real Doctor
Post by DerekF
I thought that all funerals required a coffin
Nope. You can stick the dear departed in the ground in a duvet cover or
a couple of bin bags if you want. I think it's OK to bury them naked,
too. Crematoriums generally want a coffin for handling purposes, but
cardboard is fine, as is anything which meets the required dimensions
and doesn't leak bits out. If the body has already been dismantled,
perhaps for medical teaching, you can fit it in quite a small box.
Ian
I read that cardboard is now being banned in some areas as the smoke
from them is not environmentally friendly.
I asked about one for my mothers funeral and the undertaker said that he
did not keep them in stock and would not have time to get one.
Derek
This may also be interesting
<http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-35812014>.

Sam
--
The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
Scotland, with registration number SC005336.
The Real Doctor
2016-03-21 12:04:03 UTC
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Post by Sam Wilson
This may also be interesting
<http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-35812014>.
It's sort-of interesting, but makes the mistake of assuming that "no
body" means "no funeral". It's quite possible to dispose of the body
without fuss and still have a funeral. Trust me on this.

Must go. Music to choose.

Ian
DerekF
2016-04-13 19:29:28 UTC
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Post by Sam Wilson
Post by DerekF
Post by The Real Doctor
Post by DerekF
I thought that all funerals required a coffin
Nope. You can stick the dear departed in the ground in a duvet cover or
a couple of bin bags if you want. I think it's OK to bury them naked,
too. Crematoriums generally want a coffin for handling purposes, but
cardboard is fine, as is anything which meets the required dimensions
and doesn't leak bits out. If the body has already been dismantled,
perhaps for medical teaching, you can fit it in quite a small box.
Ian
I read that cardboard is now being banned in some areas as the smoke
from them is not environmentally friendly.
I asked about one for my mothers funeral and the undertaker said that he
did not keep them in stock and would not have time to get one.
Derek
This may also be interesting
<http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-35812014>.
Sam
If its good enough for Bowie it is good enough for me.
Derek
The Real Doctor
2016-03-21 12:02:07 UTC
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Post by DerekF
I asked about one for my mothers funeral and the undertaker said that he
did not keep them in stock and would not have time to get one.
Yeah, right. Greenfield offer next day delivery on their cardboard
coffins. What your undertaker actually meant was "I can't make nearly as
much marking up a £125 wholesale cardboard coffin as I can on the piece
of veneer-covered chipboard for which I plan to charge you at least a
grand."

Which, incidentally, will make a heck of a lot more smoke when it burns
than a bit of cardboard.

Ian
DerekF
2016-04-13 19:32:10 UTC
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Post by The Real Doctor
Post by DerekF
I asked about one for my mothers funeral and the undertaker said that he
did not keep them in stock and would not have time to get one.
Yeah, right. Greenfield offer next day delivery on their cardboard
coffins. What your undertaker actually meant was "I can't make nearly as
much marking up a £125 wholesale cardboard coffin as I can on the piece
of veneer-covered chipboard for which I plan to charge you at least a
grand."
Which, incidentally, will make a heck of a lot more smoke when it burns
than a bit of cardboard.
Ian
One would assume more smoke but many crematoriums say that smoke from
cardboard clogs up the filters they now have.
Derek
DerekF
2016-04-13 19:39:09 UTC
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Post by The Real Doctor
Post by DerekF
I asked about one for my mothers funeral and the undertaker said that he
did not keep them in stock and would not have time to get one.
Yeah, right. Greenfield offer next day delivery on their cardboard
coffins. What your undertaker actually meant was "I can't make nearly as
much marking up a £125 wholesale cardboard coffin as I can on the piece
of veneer-covered chipboard for which I plan to charge you at least a
grand."
Which, incidentally, will make a heck of a lot more smoke when it burns
than a bit of cardboard.
Ian
The father of a friend in America donated his body to medical research.
About a year later the organization held a a service the families of
those who had donated their remains.
I always felt that the absence of a funeral soon after the death did not
give my friend the closure he needed.
Derek
bert
2016-04-13 21:02:51 UTC
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Post by DerekF
The father of a friend in America donated his body to medical research.
About a year later the organization held a a service the families of
those who had donated their remains.
The University of Edinburgh's School of Medicine has such a service
annually, in their local parish church (Greyfriars Kirk). All the
students are expected to attend, too, and they are clearly reminded
how important these donations have been for their training.

This year's service will be on Wednesday 4 May.
--
The Real Doctor
2016-04-17 13:19:11 UTC
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Post by DerekF
The father of a friend in America donated his body to medical research.
About a year later the organization held a a service the families of
those who had donated their remains.
I always felt that the absence of a funeral soon after the death did not
give my friend the closure he needed
I've sent two family bodies to medical research over the past few years.
I don't think any of use were in doubt that the deceased had, erm,
deceased ... this whole notion of "closure" seems a bit overrated to me.
We had memorial services, though, one when we got the bits back and one
while they were still being used.

Ian

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